The Tracker (2002) Film. Director : Rolf de Heer

It’s 1922; somewhere in Australia. When a Native Australian man is accused of murdering a white woman, three white men (The Fanatic, The Follower and The Veteran) are given the mission of capturing him with the help of an experienced Native Australian (The Tracker). So they start their quest in the outback, not knowing that their inner wrestles against and for racism will be more dangerous that the actual hunting for the accused. (Imdb)

Periferic (Outbound) (2010) Film. Director : Bogdan George Apetri

Midway through her prison sentence, Matilda is granted a 24-hour temporary release. Not willing to return to jail, she plans to escape and flee the country. But before the day is over, Matilda must first confront her troubled past. She visits the family she left a long time ago; Andrei, her estranged brother, is reluctant to offer any help, and his wife would rather throw her out. But Matilda won’t give up, and when the conflict finally bursts open, it jeopardizes not only the possibilities of help, but also the real hopes of reconciliation.  (Mubi)

Wymyk (Courage) (2011) Film. Director : Greg Zglinski

Alfred and Jerzy take part in a brutal incident: during a train ride, a couple of hooligans harass a young woman. Jerzy stands in her defense. Alfred hesitates and becomes a helpless bystander as his younger brother is thrown off the moving train. ‘Courage’ is about people whose lives get disturbed by a violent act, which forces them to reveal who they really are. (Imdb)

Giorni e nuvole (Days and Clouds) (2007) Film. Director : Silvio Soldini

Anna has become everything that she was expected to become: she has a job which is unpretentious but decorous; she is lively, affectionate with her family, friends and her partner, Alessio, with whom she has decided to have a child. What she lacks is perhaps only the courage to take responsibility for her future once and for all.

Her future has the shape of an office, in a city that is continually expanding, the pale colours of a train that takes her from the suburbs to the centre of town, and the stronger shades of a relationship which seems serene to her. When Domenico bursts into her life, however, all those contours disappear and for the first time she focuses on love, desire and passion. But in spite of her physical fulfilment Anna’s love has limits: Domenico is married to Miriam and they have two children.

Domenico and Anna’s story is a whispered rebellion, with its secret meetings, its caresses suffocated when the lunch break ends, and its trysts in order to have sex in a motel room rented by the hour. Until Anna decides she wants much more and the lies won’t hold up anymore.(Mubi)

Monsieur Lazhar (2011) Film. Director : Philippe Falardeau

Bachir Lazhar, an Algerian immigrant, is hired to replace an elementary school teacher who died tragically. While the class goes through a long healing process, nobody in the school is aware of Bachir’s painful former life; nor that he is at risk of being deported at any moment. Adapted from Evelyne de la Cheneliere’s play, Bachir Lazhar depicts the encounter between two distant worlds and the power of self-expression. Using great sensitivity and humor, Philippe Falardeau follows a humble man who is ready to transcend his own loss in order to accompany children beyond the silence and taboo of death.(Imdb)

Black Butterflies (2011) Film. Director: Paula van der Oest

Poetry, politics, madness, and desire collide in the true story of the woman hailed as South Africa’s Sylvia Plath. In 1960s Cape Town, as Apartheid steals the expressive rights of blacks and whites alike, young Ingrid Jonker (Carice van Houten, Black Book) finds her freedom scrawling verse while frittering through a series of stormy affairs. Amid escalating quarrels with her lovers and her rigid father, a parliament censorship minister (Rutger Hauer), the poet witnesses an unconscionable event that will alter the course of both her artistic and personal lives.

Ravishing cinematography by Giulio Biccari and a classical approach to dramatic storytelling by consummate Dutch filmmaker Paula van der Oest augment van Houten’s magnetic central performance in Black Butterflies. As a woman governed by equal parts genius and mercurial gloom, Jonker could inspire passion but never, it seems, love—a sad truth critically conveyed by van Houten. Jonker’s inner turmoil mirrored her country’s upheaval, but van der Oest is never heavy-handed with her parallels of the poet and the South African maelstrom happening around her: The relationships in the film are a lens through which to view a cultural zeitgeist, but the people always have center stage, not the politics.(Mubi)